GYULA HINCZ

"PORTRAIT OF A WOMAN"

MIXED MEDIA ON PAPER LAID ON CANVAS

HUNGARY, WORKED IN PARIS, C.1930

39 X 31.5 INCHES

Gyula Hincz

1904-1987

Gyula was born in Budapest, Hungary in 1904. Between 1922 and 1929 he studied with Gyula Rudnay and János Vaszary at l’École des Beaux-Arts de Budapest. He traveled to Paris in 1926 and Berlin in 1928.

Hincz is best known as a painter of murals, under-paintings for tapestries and interior design elements. He also worked as a sculptor and graphic artist. Hincz illustrated many books and theatre set designs. His paintings incorporated interesting non-figurative compositions portraying the influences of Cubism and Surrealism as well as Metaphysical subject matter.

He won a scholarship and traveled to Rome in 1930-31 as a member of the Collège Hongrois. While visiting in Rome, Hincz learned about Purism and Futurism; which briefly influenced the development of his work. Hincz eventually returned to a more Neo-Classical style. As his style matured, Hincz became more and more influenced by Picasso’s oeuvre. Stylistically, Hincz’s work conveys the influences of his studies and travels and is considered expressionistic.

Hincz participated in several group exhibitions, notably a 1928 show in Berlin with Der Strum. Solo shows include a 1928 exhibition in Berlin and 1946 show in Hungary. Hincz won the Prix Kossuth et Munkacsy. He was declared an Artiste Émérite. In 1946 Hincz received professorship at l’École des Arts Décoratifs in Hungary. He received the same offer in 1949 from l’École des Beaux-Arts. From 1958 until 1963, he was the director of l’École des Arts Décoratifs and stayed on as a professor until 1969.

Hincz’s work has been discussed in Mazenod’s Peintre Contemporains, published in Paris, 1968 as well as Hongrie 1968 published by Pannonia, Budapest, 1968. Additionally, Géza Csorba discussed Hincz’s work in the catalog essay for the 1970 exhibition Art Hongrois Contemporain at the Musée Galliéra, Paris.

Hincz died in 1987.